Pastor: Are you fulfilling these four key tasks?

Leadership

It’s surprising how often we engage in an activity or work without thinking about all the parts and pieces involved. I drive a manual transmission car. Yes, by choice. When I drive, I don’t even think about shifting gears up or down. It’s automatic, or unconscious to me. In certain contexts, this isn’t always a good thing. In ministry, you could be about the work and not be aware of the parts you may or may not be fulfilling. You could be drifting along automatically doing what you do without understanding some key parts. Are you aware of at least these four key tasks of a Pastor?

I grew up in a pastor’s home. I have invested 30 years of my life in local church ministry, as an Education Pastor, Family Pastor and the like, and now serving over a decade as an Executive Pastor. Whatever the role or title, from Senior Pastor on, we all have components of ‘the work’ to fulfill. The opportunities to learn some lessons and make some observations about pastoring the local church are abundant, and we never stop learning and growing.

I have an immense gratitude for being able to serve the Lord in this way through my life. The kindness of the churches to me and my family is great. The gratitude I have for those who have shared life in ministry is immeasurable. It is also such a joy to see young ministers now being equipped and trained to continue to serve the church as we move ahead together.

Over the last decade, I had the great privilege of serving with Dr. Hance Dilbeck at Quail Springs Baptist Church. He now leads the work of Oklahoma Baptists. Through that season I not only heard the following framework for ministry, but observed it and then practiced it. It is beautifully simple in its concept and practice. When done well, its balance yields strength and growth for you as a minister and for the congregation.

Listen to Peter’s admonishment to pastors from 1 Peter 5:1-3…

Therefore, I exhort the elders among you, as your fellow elder and witness of the sufferings of Christ, and a partaker also of the glory that is to be revealed, shepherd the flock of God among you, exercising oversight not under compulsion, but voluntarily, according to the will of God; and not for sordid gain, but with eagerness; nor yet as lording it over those allotted to your charge, but proving to be examples to the flock.

Feed

A primary task of pastoring is feeding. Shepherds guide their flocks to safety, cool water and food. If the congregation is starved for God’s word, there will be problems. A primary task of the pastor, in any position, is preaching and teaching. I feel the burden anytime I preach as I see the eyes of individuals who are looking to be fed the Word of God.

Paul reminds us In 2 Tim 4:2 to preach the word; be ready in season and out of season; reprove, rebuke, and exhort, with complete patience and teaching.”

Care

Think about the hungry crowds following Jesus as they longed for help physically and spiritually. Jesus saw them like sheep without a shepherd. Pastor, pray for your people, visit, care and call your people. Share notes of encouragement with them. Weep with them. Laugh with them. Counsel and guide them. Do life with them.

Do you see your people as a burden, or as problems, or as the whole reason for shepherding? Jesus responded to the people in Matthew 9:36, “Seeing the people, He felt compassion for them, because they were distressed and dispirited like sheep without a shepherd.

Lead

We see the early church leaders almost immediately making decisions and guiding the church. They led the church to select servants/deacons to help with distribution of food and care of widows, the work of councils and meetings on important doctrinal decisions, and the financial care of the early churches. Some have asked me, what does an Executive Pastor do? My quick answer, “Make decisions.” All day. Every day. I fulfill a duty with the church and our leadership to help make decisions. It is not easy. 99% of the decisions made are not simply right and wrong, good and bad, but a choice of options. If we go this direction, these are potential outcomes, or if this way, other outcomes. And then there are big decisions and issues that birth gray hair. Pastor, do not neglect the importance and privilege of making decisions.

And God has appointed in the church, first apostles, second prophets, third teachers, then miracles, then gifts of healings, helps, administrations, various kinds of tongues. 1 Corinthians 12:28

Share

Of the four areas I am mentioning here, One area of my own ministry that suffers the most is this one. Regardless if I say I have the “gift of evangelism” or not, the bottom line is the command of the Lord to share the Good News and make disciples. Disciples cannot be made apart from hearing the Good News and surrendering to it.

Paul shares this so plainly in Romans 10:14-15. “How then will they call on Him in whom they have not believed? How will they believe in Him whom they have not heard? And how will they hear without a preacher? 15 How will they preach unless they are sent? Just as it is written, “How beautiful are the feet of those who bring good news of good things!”

Paul also directly admonishes Timothy to this work in 2 Timothy 4:5. “But you, be sober in all things, endure hardship, do the work of an evangelist, fulfill your ministry.”

Ask Yourself…

Are you aware of these four areas of responsibility? Score yourself, 0-10, from worst to best effort in each of the four areas? How are you Feeding, Caring, Leading, Sharing? What area is naturally easy for you (automatic)? Which task is an area for growth? What will you do this week to enhance one of these areas of growth in ministry?

One word about Church Staff Pastoring teams. While I am responsible to fulfill duties as a pastor like those listed above, I also serve at a church with multiple pastors, including most importantly, the Senior Pastor. The beauty of these tasks is I can, and prayerfully do, take a portion of some of these duties off of the Senior Pastor. For example to focus more of his time and attention to Feeding the flock (preaching), I tend to focus more of my time and attention and giftedness to Caring and Leading. The only caution is for me or anyone to neglect any of the other areas on your Pastoral Staff team. For example, while I preach infrequently, I still stay sharp and preach often. I find great fulfillment and clarity in serving with my Senior Pastor in this way!

It is a joy to serve with you – Ray

Obstacles or Opportunities

Leadership

How many times have you heard ‘unprecedented’ since the COVID19 season hit us? It truly has been just that! I heard a new one today that was beginning to be tiresome for some and that is ‘fluid’. It’s true, that word totally captures so much of our current path – fluid – who knows the future. In our challenges, I find great hope.

Do you see opportunity?

Recently while spending some time in quiet devotion, I was inspired by a simple phrase in the midst of a powerful story. Early believers and leaders in the Christian faith were sharing the hope found in Christ. In Acts we find a leading disciple, Peter, in a situation that had options. He had choices about what to do next, and it says in Acts 3:12 “He saw his opportunity and addressed the crowd.” NLT

I know that is teasing out a bit of an obscure phrase in the midst of the situation of this narrative, but Peter, in his situation assessed the situation, saw the opportunity and pressed “go!”

What are the opportunities?

I have been considering much through this season, as we all have I’m sure. One of my dear leader coach friends, Jeremie, challenges people to consider on their next steps in the journey what will be “my aha take-aways, and what will be left behind.”

Here are some things on my “take-away, leave behind” list:

  • More time reserved to think, rest and ponder. Simply, slow down.
  • I am leaving behind mindless churn. There was a pace that was not even recognizable for so many of us until this time-out.
  • More time invested in simple time with family and friends; meals, walks.
  • More time invested in relationships at work and in my own neighborhood – meaningful conversations.
  • More time invested in things that build strength in mind, body and spirit.
  • Flexible work environments and options.
  • Usage of technology and innovation; zoom, online media – for everything: family, meetings, connectivity, groups, large broadcasts, and podcasts!
  • Simply, and like Peter, using every opportunity to share how my faith in Christ gives me strength, in good and bad, stress free times and times of panic!
  • This is just a start…

Take this time to consider what you see, and then seize the opportunity. Time to start the engines in a new way!

COVID19 – Moving forward

Leadership

As COVID19 restrictions are lifting and we are entering into uncharted waters. There will be new guidelines for how we gather in groups. It is likely that how we gather will be different for some time. If you lead in your context, now is the time to keep the right mindset in guiding. We can guide people to adjust to new ways of doing things. We need to be communicating clearly what’s ahead, and quite frankly, just staying calm.

Delicate navigation

A few years back my wife was invited on a special cruise. I was glad to be her personal assistant! On the trip I was fascinated by something I had never seen before – the cruise ship Harbor Pilot. In the image above, you can see the Harbor Pilot boat that ferried the Pilot on and off our vessel. The Pilot is not on the full cruise. He is rather on board long enough to assist the Captain in safely navigating the harbor. He knows the way around other vessels, and obstacles and barriers.

I serve in a large organization. In the best of times it takes the ‘seven touches’ of communication to get through to the largest percentage of our people. We simply need to hear something seven times for it to get across. Add to that the very real and heightened sensitivity of COVID19. The plan and communication has to be crystal clear. This is also made even more complex by the range of people’s reactions to COVID19. Some may respond by thinking, ‘this is nothing, why aren’t we back to normal.’ While others may think ‘this is dangerous, and we should not be out at all’.

Keep it simple

As we prepare for some uncharted waters, like our own new schedule we’ve never had before, I have heard our team share frequently – this has to be simple and clear. We are working even now to strip away minute details with our communication pieces to just the basics. In other words, we want to answer the biggest questions. We want to respond to the biggest concerns. Then we describe the first steps. If subsequent steps and answers will come as people are literally on that path, there is no need to clutter the first round of instruction.

Say it multiple ways

The Communications Director in our organization, and our staff do an amazing job of helping us get the word out! There is a pretty massive message communicate over the next days as we relaunch our campus on May 31. It will involve sharing it in multiple ways: website, social media, e-newsletter, video, letter, card, and networking with leadership groups.

As we pilot our organizations through this new harbor, be confident of where you are headed. Narrow down and simplify what you need to communicate, and share it often and in multiple ways. And yes, stay calm and positive – we will get through this!